Bits of a Boat

Click on any part of the image to get a better understanding of the terminology and what it is used for.

Bits of a Boat

Bits of a Boat
Rudder Blade Jib Mainsail Keel Rudder Hull Helm Boom Mast

Rudder Blade

Rudder Blade

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Jib

Jib

Boats may be sailed using only a jib, but generally jibs make a minor direct contribution to propulsion compared to a main sail. Generally, a jib’s most crucial function is as an airfoil, increasing performance and overall stability by reducing turbulence on the main sail’s leeward side.

jib, left, compared to a genoa, right.

The foretriangle is outlined in red.

Taken from Wikipedia

Mainsail

There are many types of mainsail. A basic definition consists of – A mainsail is a sail rigged on the main mast of a sailing vessel. The sail’s foot is normally attached to a boom.

For example – The modern Bermuda rig uses a triangular mainsail aft of the mast, coordinated with a jib for sailing upwind, this job or genoa can be larger than the mainsail. In downwind conditions (with the wind behind the boat) a spinnaker replaces the jib.

Taken from Wikipedia

Keel

The longitudinal structure along the base of a ship, supporting the framework of the whole vessel, in some vessels this is extended downwards as a ridge to increase stability and can contain ballast to help with counterbalancing the boat to provide stability.

Paraphrased from oxford languages and Wikipedia

https://languages.oup.com/google-dictionary-en/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keel

Rudder

An underwater blade that is positioned at the stern of a boat or ship and controlled by its helm and that when turned causes the vessel’s head to turn in the same direction

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rudder

Hull

A hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. The hull may open at the top (such as a dinghy ), or it may be fully or partially covered with a deck. Atop the deck may be a deckhouse and other superstructures, such as a funnel or mast.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hull_(watercraft)

Helm

Helm: Where you steer the boat. Usually this is a big wheel, but on smaller boats it can be a tiller, which is basically a long wooden stick. Either of these can be used to control the boat’s rudder.

Boom

A horizontal spar attached to the aft of the mast just below the sail. The boom is attached to the sail and keeps the sail flatter when at an angle from the centreline of the boat

www.lovesailing.net

Mast

A tall vertical spar that supports the sails

www.lovesailing.net

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